An introduction to the importance and the popularity of the internet in todays society

With its fast-moving, visually interesting, highly entertaining style, it commands many people's attention for several hours each day.

An introduction to the importance and the popularity of the internet in todays society

Share via Email Internet business cables in California. It was the same size and shape as a household refrigerator, and outwardly, at least, it had about as much charm. But Kleinrock was thrilled: Had he tried to explain his excitement to anyone but his closest colleagues, they probably wouldn't have understood.

An introduction to the importance and the popularity of the internet in todays society

The few outsiders who knew of the box's existence couldn't even get its name right: Needless to say, though, the box that arrived outside Kleinrock's office wasn't a machine capable of fostering understanding among the great religions of the world.

It was much more important than that. It's impossible to say for certain when the internet began, mainly because nobody can agree on what, precisely, the internet is.

This is only partly a philosophical question: But 29 October — 40 years ago next week — has a strong claim for being, as Kleinrock puts it today, "the day the infant internet uttered its first words".

Samuel Morse, sending the first telegraph message years previously, chose the portentous phrase: It's interesting to compare how much has changed in computing and the internet since with, say, how much has changed in world politics. Consider even the briefest summary of how much has happened on the global stage since And yet nothing has quite the power to make people in their 30s, 40s or 50s feel very old indeed as reflecting upon the growth of the internet and the world wide web.

Twelve years after Charley Kline's first message on the Arpanet, as it was then known, there were still only computers on the network; but 14 years after that, 16 million people were online, and email was beginning to change the world; the first really usable web browser wasn't launched untilbut by we had Amazon, by Google, and byWikipedia, at which point there were million people online.

Today the figure is more like 1. Unless you are 15 years old or younger, you have lived through the dotcom bubble and bust, the birth of Friends Reunited and Craigslist and eBay and Facebook and Twitterblogging, the browser wars, Google Earth, filesharing controversies, the transformation of the record industry, political campaigning, activism and campaigning, the media, publishing, consumer banking, the pornography industry, travel agencies, dating and retail; and unless you're a specialist, you've probably only been following the most attention-grabbing developments.

Here's one of countless statistics that are liable to induce feelings akin to vertigo: On the whole internet. On the one hand, they were there because of the Russian Sputnik satellite launch, inwhich panicked the American defence establishment, prompting Eisenhower to channel millions of dollars into scientific research, and establishing Arpa, the Advanced Research Projects Agency, to try to win the arms technology race.

The idea was "that we would not get surprised again," said Robert Taylor, the Arpa scientist who secured the money for the Arpanet, persuading the agency's head to give him a million dollars that had been earmarked for ballistic missile research.

The Arpanet was not, in itself, intended as some kind of secret weapon to put the Soviets in their place: The notion that the network was designed so that it would survive a nuclear attack is an urban myth, though some of those involved sometimes used that argument to obtain funding.

The technical problem solved by the IMPs wasn't very exciting, either. It was already possible to link computers by telephone lines, but it was glacially slow, and every computer in the network had to be connected, by a dedicated line, to every other computer, which meant you couldn't connect more than a handful of machines without everything becoming monstrously complex and costly.

The solution, called "packet switching" — which owed its existence to the work of a British physicist, Donald Davies — involved breaking data down into blocks that could be routed around any part of the network that happened to be free, before getting reassembled at the other end.

I thought that was a much more substantial and respectable research topic than merely connecting up a few machines. That was certainly useful, but it wasn't art.

Kline typed an O. Kline typed a G, at which point the system crashed, and the connection was lost. The G didn't make it through, which meant that, quite by accident, the first message ever transmitted across the nascent internet turned out, after all, to be fittingly biblical: Even when computers were mainly run on punch-cards and paper tape, there were whispers that it was inevitable that they would one day work collectively, in a network, rather than individually.

Tracing the origins of online culture even further back is some people's idea of an entertaining game: Inthe American presidential science adviser, Vannevar Bush, was already imagining the "memex", a device in which "an individual stores all his books, records, and communications", which would be linked to each other by "a mesh of associative trails", like weblinks.

Others had frenzied visions of the world's machines turning into a kind of conscious brain. And inan astonishingly complete vision of the future appeared in the magazine Astounding Science Fiction.

The Impact of the Internet on Society: A Global Perspective - MIT Technology Review

In a story entitled A Logic Named Joe, the author Murray Leinster envisioned a world in which every home was equipped with a tabletop box that he called a "logic":The Internet is extremely important in many fields, from education and healthcare to business and government.

The Internet has had an enormous impact on education, streamlining access to information and making it easier for individuals to engage in online learning. Please check your internet connection or reload this page.

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An Introduction to the Importance of the Internet in Today's Society PAGES 3. WORDS 1, View Full Essay.

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